Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Training - Apnea Walking


Apnea Walking
Apnea walking is a simple and affective exercise aimed at the improvement of ones breath holding ability. Apnea walking increases the tolerance level for high levels of CO2, Low levels of O2 and the tolerance for the build up of lactic acid in the muscles during anaerobic activity.

Attention! Always perform apnea walking practices with a buddy who is aware of what you are doing. Pushing your limits while practicing apnea walking may lead to LMC and even black out.

Performing the exercise

1)
Sit comfortably with your back straight.

2)
Place the palms of your hands on your knees.

3) Breath deep breaths (do not hyper ventilate) and prepare yourself for a breath hold.

4) Hold your breath for a period of 1 minute while sitting.

5) Stand up while still holding your breath.

6) Begin walking on a preset path.

7) Concentrate your thoughts on arriving at the end of the preset path.

8) Allow your body to rest and repeat the exercise, prolong/shorten the length of the path according to your ability.

Remember, you are not at your best at all times, the results may vary from time to time.

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4 comments:

  1. How much do I push myself here? To my limits? First contraction?

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    Replies
    1. Well, the idea is to push yourself as much as needed in order to overcome the distance you have originally set for yourself.

      Exactly how much you should push yourself - is really up to you, but I would confidently say; beyond your first contractions.

      Think of this exercise as a CO2 table :-)

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  2. Does a smoker have the advantage over non-smoker in CO2 tolerance?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No! The amount of CO2 and the time a smoker is exposed to it is very small. Also it is known that up to 15% of the hemoglobin of a smoker is occupied with carbon monoxide. So smokers actually are at a (severe) disadvantage here.
      (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1281520/)

      Delete